Strijp-S

2009, Photography

Last Saturday I visited my friend Ronald Bunnik in Eindhoven, the Philips city. I was welcomed with great hospitality and took wonderful weather with me to the South of the Netherlands. In Eindhoven we walked to Strijp-S, a former industrial area were Philips produced mostly radios, televisions, and bakelite.
the-photographers
Here below is my impression of the urban decay in the Strijp.
300509-125126-0320

300509-125234-0321

300509-125302-0322

300509-125420-0325

300509-125446-0326

300509-125454-0327

300509-125700-0329

300509-130354-0335

300509-134434-0348

300509-194914-0350

300509-195518-0357

300509-200926-0366
All photographs by Wouter Brandsma except for the upper right photograph by Ronald Bunnik

Advertisements

11 thoughts on “Strijp-S

  1. I like the shadow of the lamp post, great lines and patterns make for interesting viewing. Also like the graffiti on the wall with the patterns of the light in front.

  2. I really like the Moderne style factory building; is it still used? It would make a marvellous residential building as part of a regeneration of the area! Although I wonder if 1930s -50s architecture doesn’t have quite the same appeal to you in the Netherlands that it does here in Australia where it counts as being quite old (I live in a house which is about 130 years old, and people think that’s really ancient – but the the European history of the continent is only 200 years)

    1. Most of the buildings are not in use, but will be after they regenerated the area. It will be a residential and shopping area. Many of the buildings are from the 1920s and they consider it now an industrial cultural heritage, although that hasn’t always be the case. We were a quiet country before the war, but went into a state of progress after the war.

      While Eindhoven is more than 700 years old, it became a meaningful place in the end of the 19th century when Philips started a factory there to produce light bulbs. The city growth and buildings are the result of the spin off by Philips.

      Australia’s past might be young, but our European past is often relatively young too.

  3. The third picture has some very interesting diagonals! Especially if you look longer, there is a lot there to explore. Thanks for a great day!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s